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morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
but while preparing israeli troops are gathering on the border. even as egypt works to broker a deal, former british prime minister tony blair traveled to tel aviv to sit down with israeli president perez. >> i hope that over the coming days we can achieve cessation on a basis that is sustainable. >> and joining me now from gaza, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman. what's the latest on what's happening in cairo? >> good afternoon, tamron. well egyptian officials have met with the leaders of the two major palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they wa
jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
with secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister standing side by side. secretary clinton calling the agreement a step in the right direction. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. the rocket attacks must end. a broader, calmer return. the people of the region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> today's announcement follows secretary clinton's diplomatic barnstorm through the middle east and made stops in egypt, west bank and egypt. and it follows more than a week of cross border rocket fire exchanges between israel and hamas in gaza. now, that has left 100 people dead. joining me now from gaza is nbc news foreign correspondent amman mulhadeen. i saw you turn around and notice the night skylight up behind you. that was a minute within the cease-fire taking effect. do we know that's rocket fire coming in behind you? >> reporter: it was, in fact. it was an israeli air strike north of where we are. gaza is still very much a war zone atmospher
egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday and the asias today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleasure, eliot. >> eliot: it seems to me with all this screaming and shouting about susan rice's testimony. the only thing that struck me for legitimate upset might be that general petraeus has said he believed it was a terrorist and the u.n. ambassador said originally it was not that. is that a legitimate area of some investigation by congress? >> in fairness to susan rice. she did not say it was an act of terrorist. she didn't rule it out either. she made clear her understanding of what happened would evolve over time. the significance of general petraeus on the hill is to begin a more fullsome process to answer questions that still don't have complete answers. the second dimension will be the completion of the accountability review board the arb that the state department is working on and will be released next month
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
. i find his role in all of this fascinating. i mean here, taking over egypt after the arab spring, an ally whether we approved of what he, did he was an ally for so long. coming out of the accords. does egypt see its role as a peacemaker. does it gain currency by being that? >> i think from the american perspective, egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity and so the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yeah. you know, john mccain, we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion about who he thinks should be over in the middle east talking to these people. here's john mccain. >> find someone even as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton. to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that but we need a person of enormous prestige and influence to have these parties sit down together as an honest broker. >> you know, when we hear mccain s
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
's go new to egypt where there's another political crisis brewing and some of it is taking place exactly where the arab spring started. got new video to share with you here of opponents demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed m
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
hillary clinton has obviously been very busy moving between jerusalem, the west bank, egypt. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in tel aviv. what are you hearing about the cease fire? >> reporter: you know, we were on the cusp of a cease-fire it seemed like last night and it seemingly fell apart. however, we did hear from israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu that they still want a diplomatic solution, which is a real sign that at the very least the negotiations are still going on. we know that secretary clinton is shuttling back and forth throughout the region trying to make that happen. it's complicated today, chris, by this bus blast in jerusalem. there were at least 11 people injured, several of them seriously. officials here are calling it a terrorist attack although not a suicide attack. and as you know, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after
over egypt after the arab spring. mubarak was an ally to the country for so long, coming out of the camp david accords where sedatesadat was. >> i think from the american perspective egypt is a necessary broker. they consider hamas a terrorist entity. the u.s. does not directly deal with hamas. in order to be a broker between both sides the u.s. necessarily needs to deal with egypt. >> yes well, you know, john mccain we see hillary clinton there. john mccain had another opinion who he thinks should be over in the mideast talking to these people. >> even someone as high ranking frankly as former president bill clinton to go and be the negotiator. i know he would hate me for saying that, but we need someone of enormous prestige and influence to sit down with the parties together and work as a broker. >> when we see mccain saying something nice about a democrat, he has to go and say one more thing. this is john mccain once again. >> if this god-forbid violence escalates, if someone was there brokering the process and bringing a halt to it. now the president makes phone callscall
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
's strategic interest, is also important to egypt. they have a very difficult time in economic terms, and let's not forget that the revolution there was indigenous, it was local and it was, in large part, over domestic issues, jobs, education, health care, what concerns people everywhere. he needs a stable situation there. he needs to concentrate on economic growth, providing jobs. he obviously has to recognize and acknowledge public opinion, which is an important factor there as here. but, for now, i think it's a positive step. what he's done with respect to the ceasefire. >> you saw a reporter in gaza who talked about the many celebrations throughout the day on thursday there. has hamas emerged stronger from this last eight days of the conflict? there are those who suggest that's the case? >> clearly, yes. and a dangerous signal is being sent throughout the entire region. palestinians are split. the palestinian authority, which controls the executive branch of government as a result of their election several years ago, is opposed to violence. they took the position we favor, nonviolent nego
and israel, that eight-day bombardment of rockets going back and forth and egypt having to step in to broker a peace deal, do you think that if the u.n. recognizes statehood that palestine and palestinians and israeli negotiations would be better suited to coming up to a longer standing two-state solution? >> to get a state that will have only through negotiations. they know it. we know it. united states knows it. all the europeans know it. after the operations in gaza they feel maybe -- they have to encourage him and do everything to -- maybe help him. they had like to help him by the recognition today. it's a meaningless resolution. to get a state should be only through negotiations. all of us knows it. we are trying to negotiate with them since we took power. not only us. the former prime minister offered them almost everything. 98.5% of the territory. they didn't say yes. when barak was prime minister of israel, he offered the same to arafat and arafat said yes -- said no. so now since we took power, they put any obstacle they could in order to resume the negotiations. first they ask pri
, not letting up with its air assault. right now, representatives from the two sides are in egypt, trying to negotiate a cease-fire. but they're not talking directly to one another. cnn's anderson cooper is live for us this morning from gaza city. anderson, good morning. set the scene for us there. >> yeah, good morning. as you said it has been another day of explosions here and rockets being fired toward israel. i saw at least five rockets being fired over the last several hours toward israel from here in gaza city. which is where most of the rockets are being fired from. and also a number of explosions incoming rockets, or air strikes by israeli forces throughout the day. at least more than a dozen that i've heard over the last several hours. don't have any reports, really, on casualties today. we just had a rocket go off right there. neil, if you can zoom in. you can see the trail right there in the sky. that would be the sixth rocket that we've heard over the last several hours. there was a response from the israeli defense forces earlier to some of the rockets, at least two of the ro
on his side? chris van hollen will join us live. plus, another day of deadly protests in cairo over egypt's president morsi's new sweeping powers that he is seeking. we'll get a live report. plus, the former head of florida's republican party, he's making a stunning claim about the state's early voting law saying it was deliberately designed to suppress minority votes. it's just one of the things we thought you should know. join our conversation on twitter. you can find us at @tamronhall and at @newsnation. a winter wonderland doesn't just happen. it takes some doing. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together. from the things that hang and shine... ...to the things that sparkle and jingle. all while saving the things that go in our wallet. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get fresh cut savings. live trees are arriving weekly. now's a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs? and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your
. >> this is the ate latest in a series of moves he engaged in. in august he sidelined egypt's military council and took their powers for himself, the legislative and constitutional assembly powers they had and the only check remaining on his power after that time was the judiciary and now he swept aside that check. he has consolidated all power for thims and asked the people to trust him and guide egypt through this transitional period. >> protesters want him to step down. what do you see happening here? >> looks like neither side is prepared to back down. you're right. they're not prepared to trust him. morsi is not some sort of reveered national figure that played a role in the revolution. he seems a very partisan guy that really has islamist interests at heart so the liberals see no other choice but to go out in the street and protest until morsi backs down and looks like now both sides are angling for a compromise. >> what can the west do? >> i think it is no mistake this is taking place after the gaza conflict. the movie mentioned last year took place after a big terrorist attack in the s
. >> second term shuffle. as they say. here we go. >> yes, it is. >>> new demonstrations set across egypt with tension growing over president morsi's recent power grab. protesters tossed molotov cocktails at police in cairo's tahrir square as they rallied against morsi's decision last week to seize absolute power and put himself above judicial review. now, some morsi supporters canceled a competing rally in cairo, hoping to diffuse anger and tension. >>> also mourners have gathered at the burned out factory in bangladesh to remember the workers who died there. at least 110 people were killed and dozens injured in a fire after the disaster armed police were at the factory in order to maintain some order. workers rights' groups are hoping global outrage about safety conditions at factories throughout bangladesh will lead to some lasting and much-needed changes. >>> well, the federal government has shut down the nation's largest organic peanut butter processor over concerns of salmonella salmonella poisoning. fda inspectors found salmonella all over sunland's new mexico processing plant. the
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)